19 Stunning Herb Flowers: Blue, Purple, White and More (With Pictures)


Do you want to buy some herbs that look amazing and rich in color when they bloom? Perhaps you purchased some seeds, and you want to have an idea of how they look like when their flower comes out? Here is a photo guide that will show you what herbs produce mesmerizing purple, yellow, blue, white, or even red flowers. Did you choose the right one?

Hence, what are those herbs with purple, white, blue, red, and yellow flowers? Here a list of herbs with the color of their flower:

Purple

Red

Pink

Yellow

White

Blue

Lavender

Pineapple Sage

Anise

Tarragon

Chamomile

Forget me not

Victoria blue sage

Rosemary

Rosemary

Dill

Catnip

Borage

Rosemary

Oregano

Lovage

Rosemary

Blue of the Heaven

Sage

Chives

Basil

Rosemary

    

Spearmint

 
    

Coriander

 
  1. Red: Pineapple Sage,
  2. Purple: Anise, Victoria Blue Sage,
  3. Pink: Anise, Rosemary, Italian Oregano, Chives
  4. Yellow: Tarragon, Dill,
  5. White: Chamomile, Catnip, Lovage, Rosemary, Basil, Spearmint, Parsley, Coriander
  6. Blue: Forget me not, Rosemary, Borage, Sage

Knowing the color of those herbs is undoubtedly essential. However, not all blue are the same! For instance, forget-me-not flowers have a deeper blue tone compared to the majority of rosemary varieties. Yes, varieties! There are dozens of rosemary with different leaves color. Check them out in the photo guide below.

What Color Your Herb Flowers Will Be? Quick Tip

Someone told you that rosemary has beautiful white petals while sage purple. Correct? No

Indeed, what you really need to know when buying herbs (or any other plants) is their scientific name. Why? Rosemary Blue Lagoon (scientific name) produces pink flowers, not blue as the ones of the Rosemary Officinalis Roman Beauty (scientific name). However, both herbs might be called merely rosemary. If you do not know their scientific name, you might end up with pink rosemary flowers (quite lovely by the way) when perhaps you were planning blue ones!

What can you do?

Check this photo guide here and, when you find an herb that you like, just write down (or take a picture) its scientific name (in red in the figures below the common name). Then, when you are at the shop or nursery, ask for the scientific name of the herb or check the label if you are buying from seeds.

Purple Flowers Herbs: Great Contrast with White Flowers

Here is a list of the most wonderful herbs that are possible to grow indoors (although for some of them not very easy) and well known for their mesmerizing purple color. I love placing them close (in the same only if possible, check companion planting) close to white flower herbs.

Something to remember

Purples are not all equal! Some herbs have a way more intense color than others. Hence, always check the photo of this guide and, once you have the scientific name (in red in the photo), check by yourself also other pictures.

Lavender

This is one of the most known herbs, especially among beginners with a passion for ornamental herbs. Indeed, although not very versatile in the kitchen (mainly for tea, aromas, and some sweets), this perennial produces a bunch of small and purple flowers.

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

0.5m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained soil

Here something to remember

Although this lavender is the most common, around, there are dozen of varieties. Most of them are purple, with the exception of the Lavandula angustifolia ‘Nana Alba’ in which flowers are white.

Victoria Blue Sage

I know, I thought the same. A blue sage should be blue, right? But check the color of its stunning flowers in the picture below. Despite their blue note, they are definitely more purple.

Although this herb can grow indoors with adequate light and soil (and space), it is not the easiest way, and many gardeners report more success as an outdoor herb.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

High when fully grow

0.5m

Watering Requirements

moist but well-drained soil

Red Flower Herbs: A Vivid Color

Apparently, among herbs, the red color looks the rarest. Indeed, in my research, only one was the herb with such intense color.

Pineapple Sage

As the name suggests, this herb is a sage. However, it is different from the victoria variety (discussed above). Indeed, the petals of this sage variety are extremely bright and red. Their color is very similar to one of the roses.

An extra plus?

Pineapple sage flowers and leaves are edible. Jam and tea are the main applications.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

well-drained

Lifespan

Annual to perennial

High when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

well-drained

White Flowers Herbs: Simple and Elegant

There is no doubt that, among herbs, those with white flowers are way more widespread. Quite surprisingly, the vast majority of those herbs grown for culinary purposes (that you might have on your kitchen counter right now) are very likely to produce some (or many) white flowers.

However, how do they look? Let’s check them in the pictures below.

Chamomile

This herb, quite famous for its infusion (I have 2 chamomiles a day, so tasty). Once you grow it and dry its flowers, it will be quite easy to prepare such a delicious and healthy infusion.

How to Make Chamomile Tea | With Chamomile Flowers and Fresh Sage | #121

His flowers, a bit reminding the daisy ones, are white.

Lifespan

annual

High when fully grow

0.3 m

Watering Requirements

well-drained

Catnip

If you are a cat lover, it is very likely that you have this herb in some corner for your cat, a heaven for him. Indeed, several studies have shown that such herbs have hallucinogenic effects on your pet (causing no harm to your pet), as discussed by Texas University.

Its flowers are quite small (with interesting purple spots) and probably are not the ones you might look for to add a significant spark of color to your indoor garden.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

0.5 m

Waterzng Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Genovese Basil

This herb does not need any further introduction. The staple of the Italian cuisine and the basil you find in every supermarket, store. This herb produces fragrant leaves that can be used in countless dishes. Its flowers are white and quite small. This is not the herb that I would place in my kitchen for its flower display (as very modest).

To remember: more often than not, my basil displayed white leaves, but sometimes it produced (pale) pink ones.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

annual

Height when fully grow

0.5 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Spearmint

This is another excellent aromatic herb that, although less deployed than basil, still represents a great addition to many dishes due to its fresh taste. Its tiny white flowers placed in a kind of circular conical structure make a beautiful indoor display. However, in my case, given its great taste, I have it indoor for its great taste rather than for its white and elegant flower display.

Like in the case of basil, although all my spearmint produced white flowers, some gardeners saw pale pink flowers.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Coriander

Coriander, another great culinary herb, when bloom produces some tiny and delicate white flowers with oval-shaped. Among the culinary herbs, after the blue rosemary, is one of my favorites.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

annual

Height when fully grow

0.5 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Parsley

These herbs also called flat-leaf parsley (variety napolenoum). Last but not least, we have the great parsley. This herb is widely used in cooking with dozens of recipes. It is different from coriander, as discussed in this article, although it is quite easy to confuse them. Their tiny, dome-arranged white flower looks great on a sunny windowsill in your kitchen.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

annual

High when fully grow

0.5 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Pink Flowers Herbs: A Gentle Color

Perhaps you like pink flowers more than white ones? Then, this is the section for you. The good news is that many of the most common culinary herbs that, hence, might already be hanging in your house, produce pink flowers.

What do they look like? Let’s check them out.

Anise

This is an herb you might consider growing indoors due to its benefits (as seed mainly) for the digestive tract, pain reliever, and much more.

Here a curious fact about anise: this herb produces two different types of leaves depending on their position on the stems. You can easily spot them for their different shape!

Anise produces many small flowers with pink-colored petals generally tongue-shaped. Depending on the herb condition and environment, the color can get quite intense, although it is generally pale pink.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Oregano

Here another of the greatest aromatic herbs you can encounter. Either dry or fresh this herb is used in countless Mediterranean recipes (pasta), so always great to have a plant around.

Here is a curious fact about oregano: this herb is one of the highest in zinc and magnesium, important for keeping a healthy nerve and muscle system, and boosts your immune system. For more on vitamins and minerals on the herb, check this photo guide.

This herb produces a bunch of gently pink small flowers in a small dome-like arrangement. Check them in the figure below!

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Chives

This is another herb that can be a great addition to a large variety of dishes. By far, the salmon with scrambled eggs is my favorite.

Here a curious fact about chives. Do you know that due to their aromatic smell, they are a great insect deterrent? Hence, place them in your indoor garden, among other herbs, to keep many pests away.

Its flowers have long and thin petals whose color varies from light pink to almost purple up to 2m (0.8 inches) long.

As always, remember to check the scientific name! Indeed, some chives might be blue (if you are curious, you can jump to the blue section).

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

0.3 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Blue Flowers Herbs: A Sky on Your Garden

Blue flowers, especially those with a deep color, are by far my favorite. The good news is that many herbs have blue flowers that might be a great addition to your kitchen counter. As always, I do like to match such flowers with more mild colors such as white and light pink. I would avoid purple flowers as they will fight for your eye attention.

Let’s dive into this blue flower herb. Some of them might be quite a surprise for you (blue flower garlic?)

Blue of the Heaven

Would you ever say that an herb of the garlic family-like chives can have blue flowers? No, but in reality, they can. Their name is also one of my favorites as their blue is quite intense but not as deep and reminds the sky color on a sunny day.

Here a curious fact on the blue of the heaven: this herbs, although rare naturally, is quite widespread in Siberia and Turkestan

Their flowers have the same shape as their most common purple cousin discussed in the pink section.

Photo from F.D. Richards

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

0.8 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Forget Me Not

Although this herb produces tiny flowers, it is by far one of the most wanted among gardeners for decorative purposes. This herb grows in a small bush and often is used as outdoor coverage to produce, when blooms, a blue carpet. However, it can easily grow indoors in pots. This is not an herb that you grow for culinary purposes.

Here a curious fact of forget me not: its name has countless different origins: from knights losing their lives for their loved ones to religious. Check this article for 11 surprising facts on this little but surprisingly famous herb.

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

0.3 m

Watering Requirements

Moist in poorly drained

Borage

This herb, opposite to the forget me not, produces stunning and large flowers. This herb, although it can be grown indoors, is best suited for outdoors. This herb is also known for its hairy stems and petals.

Here a curious fact about borage: the intense blue flowers of this herb are a great bee attractor. In addition, their star shape makes them even more stunning, quite a unique feature among herb flowers.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

perennial

High when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Well-drained

Growing Borage Herb Indoors - First Time Flowers Are Growing!

Yellow Flowers Herbs: For a Warm Sunny Garden

Lovage

This is not among the most common herb plants. Indeed, only a few of my friends have one indoor. This is probably due to its dimension, as it can get up to 8.2 ft (2.5m) in height, and its low usage as a culinary herb in recipes (I use it mainly in salads). Although it can be grown successfully indoors, a balcony or outdoor is probably a better location than your kitchen counter or living room.

Here something interesting on lovage: this herb is used in the UK to make a drink with brandy.

Photo from Vegan karen_hine

Lifespan

perennial

Height when fully grow

2.5 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Dill

This herb is quite peculiar with its hair-like leaves. It is quite used, especially in east European cuisine, as at the base of many soups. Dill is a great addition to salmon as well as eggs, salads, potatoes, and meat.

This herb produces small flowers in an umbrella arrangement that reminds me of the lovage discussed before.

Here a curious fact about dill: dill can pollinate with fennel. However, the new hybrid is quite tasteless, so it cannot be used as a culinary plant.

Photo from Kim and Starr

Lifespan

biennial

High when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

Tarragon

As strange as it might sound, this herb is a close cousin of sunflowers. Hence, no surprise for its bright yellow petals. However, differently from sunflowers, the petals are shorter and way larger. This herb, mainly dry, is used in a large variety of dishes.

Here a curious fact about tarragon: this is a sterile herb. Indeed, it cannot grow from seeds, but just from stem cutting.

Lifespan

biennial

High when fully grow

1 m

Watering Requirements

Moist but well-drained

The 4 Things You Need To Know When Choosing Herbs

This article has provided you with all the information you need to choose the flowers you like the most in terms of color and shape and choose the herb accordingly.

However, here 3 things you need to remember when choosing herbs:

  • Do not rely on the common name. Herbs like sage and rosemary, in reality, include a large variety of herbs. These are still called sage and rosemary, but their scientific name is different. This because, despite being all very similar, it presents some small differences. One of them might be the leaf color.

    A tip for you here: go to the RHS website here. This is a massive database of herbs and flowers. Just type in the research bar the name of any herb (even the common) ones, and it will come out with all the herbs that have the same name. Just with the word basil, I obtained 150+ results! OF course, not all of them are worth it, but many might be the case.
  • All herbs flowers in spring-summer. Hence, although you might have chosen your lavender for its deep purple leaves, it will remain a green/grey bush until the weather gets warmer (but the wait it is totally worth it);
  • Growing from seeds is harder: although growing from seeds is definitely a great experience (who does not love to see their little greenery growing every day!); however, it does require more attention. Hence, when you can, I suggest starting with an already grown herb. It will also bloom earlier;
  • Think for the non-blooming months: flowers appear only during the warmer seasons. What would you do with your herbs, when they are not producing any pretty flowers. An edible herb (tarragon, mint, etc…) is a good choice as you can harvest its tasty foliage to make your favorite dishes. That’s why I love edible herbs, pretty and so practical!

Most Beautiful Rosemary Flowers: Red, Blue, Pink, and Red

Have you noticed something in the list provided above?

Rosemary was not in any of the categories. Why? This is one of those herbs that belong to almost all types. You can have white, blue, purple and even red flowers rosemary!

Again, all boils down to the scientific name:

Red Rosemary: Grevillea rosmarinifolia, this type of rosemary is not very common as a red flower herb is, in general, pretty rare.

Blue Rosemary: the good news is that there are quite a few varieties of blue rosemary. Here the most common:

  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Salem”
  • Rosemary officinalis “Mrs. Reed’s Dark Blue” (one of the deepest blue color)
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Benenden Blue”
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Huntington Carpet”
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Tuscan Blue”
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Miss Jessopp Upright”
  • Rosemary officinalis “Golden Rain” (its leaves have golden ray on it)
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Gold Dust” (another one with deep blue flowers)
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Athens Blue Spires”
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Blue Boy” (a rare type of rosemary, a dwarf one)

Purple/Pink Rosemary: these varieties are the:

  • Rosmarinus officinalis ‘Majorca Pink’
  • Rosmarinus Officinalis Collingwood Ingram

White Rosemary: the most common varieties are the:

  • Rosmarinus officinalis “alba”
  • Rosmarinus officinalis “Nancy Howard” (its flower get white after a year or so)

19 Secret Facts of Rosemary That Very Few Knows

Rosemary is undoubtedly a versatile herb. It is drought tolerant, extremely tasty, and used in a large variety of dishes. However, there is way more than meets the eyes. Do you know, for instance, that it was the favorite herb of Napoleone? For some more curious facts, from history to science check the article below

yourindoorherbs.com is part of the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites like mine to earn advertising fees by promoting good quality Amazon.com products. I may receive a small commission when you buy through links on my website.

Andrea

A young Italian guy with a passion for growing edible herbs. After moving to the UK 6 years ago in a tiny flat, it was impossible to grow herbs outside. So I start my journey in growing indoor and so I decided to share my knowledge.

Recent Posts

Your Indoor Herbs